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Effect of topping under different nitrogen levels on agronomic characters of cotton


The International Journal of Biological Research (TIJOBR)

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Rao Saad Rehman1, Khadar Khan1, Ahsan Zaka1, Mujahid Ali1*, Nabi Ahmad1, M. Junaid Zaghum1, Muhammad Umar1, Abdul Arham1, M. Usman Anwar2

*Corresponding author: mujahid.ali2k18@outlook.com

 

Submitted Accepted Published
Sep 28,2018 Feb 19,2019 Feb 27,2019

2019 / Vol: 2 / Issue: 1


Abstract


An experiment was conducted to study the effect of topping under different nitrogen levels on growth, yield and quality of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) (Bt. Cotton) at Agronomic Research Area, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, during kharif 2017. The experiment was laid out in Randomized Complete Block design (RCBD) with factorial arrangement having three replications. Treatments included; A) Four topping levels; control (No topping), topping at 90 cm, 120 cm and 150 cm height, B) Three nitrogen levels; 150 kg ha-1, 200 kg ha-1 and 250 kg  ha-1. Upper 3-4 cm portion of terminal bud of main stem was removed when plant height was 3-4 cm more as per treatment to maintain the height of plants as per treatment (70-100 days after sowing) by regular visits. All other agronomic practices were kept normal and uniform. The data regarding the agronomic parameters were collected and statistically analyzed using Fisher’s analysis of variance technique and the treatments’ means were compared by using Tukey’s HSD (Honestly significant difference) test at 5% probability. Effect of nitrogen rate, topping as well as their interactive effect was significant on total number of bolls per plant. A comparison of all interaction values showed maximum total number of bolls per plant in plots where plants were applied with 250 kg N ha-1 and topping was done at 150 cm height which were equal to the total number of bolls per plant in plots where plants were applied with 200 kg N ha-1 and topping was done at 120 cm height. While significantly less total number of bolls was recorded when no topping was done and topping was done at 150 cm height when plants were applied with 150 kg N ha-1. Effect of nitrogen rate and topping was significant but their interactive effect was non-significant on number of aborted sites per plant. As we increased nitrogen above 200 kg ha-1 number of aborted sites per plant also increased. As plant height increased number of aborted sites per plant also increased. Effect of nitrogen rate and topping was significant but their interactive effect was non-significant on number of infested bolls per plant. As we increased nitrogen above 200 kg ha-1 number of infested bolls per plant also increased. As plant height increased number infested bolls per plant also increased. Effect of nitrogen rate, topping as well as their interactive effect was significant on seed cotton yield. At 150 kg N ha-1 maximum seed cotton yield was produced when topping was done at 90 cm height. When we applied nitrogen at the rate of 200 kg ha-1 maximum seed cotton yield was obtained when topping was performed at 120 cm height. At nitrogen application rate of 250 kg ha-1 maximum seed cotton yield was obtained when toping was done at 150 cm height. A comparison of all interaction values showed maximum seed cotton yield in plots where plants were applied with 200 kg N ha-1 and topping was done at 120 cm height. Effect of nitrogen rate was significant but effect of topping and their interactive effect was non-significant on ginning out turn (%). As nitrogen application increased ginning out turn also increased. At 250 kg N ha-1 maximum ginning out turn (%) was recorded.

Key words: cotton, nitrogen level, topping


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