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Foliar Application of Ascorbic Acid, H2O2 and Moringa leaf extract on Chia (Salvia hispanica L.) to induce terminal heat tolerance


The International Journal of Biological Research (TIJOBR)

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Sana Shaukat1, Ayesha Idrees1, Asma Hanif2, Mehwish Munir2, Ammarah Maqbool2, Qurat-ul-ain Zara3

Sana Rasheed2, Sahar Jameel4

1Department of BotanyUniversity of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan.

2Department of BotanyGovt. Sadiq College, Women University Bahawalpur, Pakistan

3Center of Agricultural Biochemistry and Biotechnology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan.

4Department of Plant Pathology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan.

Submitted Accepted Published
Oct 23,2019 Dec 12,2019 Jan 24,2020

2020 / Vol: 3 / Issue: 2


Abstract


To feed the increased population there is a need to develop multiple strategies to ensure food security. Introduction of new crops is one viable option. Chia (Salvia hispanica L.) has recently been introduced in Pakistan as a super food but its production is affected by frost and weather extremes. Foliar application of growth stimulators is a successful strategy to fight against adverse conditions in many crops. A field study has been planned to apply growth stimulators like moringa leaf extract, ascorbic acid and hydrogen peroxide (3%, 50 mg L-1, 50 mg L-1) on chia crop grown under field conditions at research area, Department of Agronomy, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad using randomized complete block design with factorial arrangements having three replications. All other agronomic inputs and practices were uniform. All MLE treatments significantly improved yield and growth of chia accessions. MLE increased 25-40% seed yield in all replications of all accessions than control. Foliar application of hydrogen peroxide and ascorbic acid enhances the yield of chia seed about 15-25%. MLE, hydrogen peroxide and ascorbic acid are best plant growth regulators, all PGR impacts positively in chia crop most of the chia accessions were originated from Mexico and Guatemala. Seed yield was linked to morphological and phonological yield related characters. More height of plant seems to be negative character for seed yield. “Enormous” varieties observed in chia germplasm opened new avenues to be tested in other agro ecological zones of Pakistan.

Key words: Chia (Salvia hispanica L.), heat tolerance, Ascorbic Acid, H2O2, Moringa leaf extract


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