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Seed associated mycoflora of coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) its effect on seed germination and management through seed treatment chemical


The International Journal of Biological Research (TIJOBR)

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Muhammad Muntazir Mehdi Khan1*, Amer Habib1, Ahsan Abdullah1, Aqib Manzoor2, Zunaira Tahir1, Khizra Zahid1, Ahsan Shabbir1, Sadia Latif& Muhammad Saqib Mushtaq1

Corresponding author: mehdikhanniazi92@gmail.com 
Submitted Accepted Published
Jul 19,2018 Dec 11,2018 Jan 27,2019

2019 / Vol: 2 / Issue: 1


Abstract


Coriander is one of the most important economic crops in Pakistan. Coriander seeds are sensitive and are susceptible to rot, decay and degradation by mycoflora, insects and other organisms, thereby reducing the quality of crop seeds. Four samples of coriander seeds were collected from four different regions in Faisalabad and Rahim Khan Khan. Faisalabad, Samandari, Rahim Yar Khan and Khan Pur. These samples were brought to the Seed Testing Laboratory, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad. The samples were stored in polythene bags in the refrigerator at 4 °C, until the seeds were inserted into the relevant studies. These samples were examined using the standard blotter paper method as well as the mean PDA method to assess the level of infection associated with the fungal. The isolated mycoflora was Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Alternaria alternate, Penicillium spp. And Botrytis spp. Highly fungal incidence was observed in case of PDA method as compared to blotter paper method in seeds collected from R.Y. Khan. Aspergillus flavus detected at maximum level (41.85%) of incidence while Penicillium spp. exhibited minimum (28.53%) level of incidence. Highly fungal incidence was observed in case of PDA method as compared to blotter paper method in seeds collected from Khan pur. Aspergillus flavus detected at maximum level (39.43%) of incidence while Botrytis spp. exhibited minimum (26.20%) level of incidence. Highly fungal incidence was observed in case of PDA method as compared to blotter paper method in seeds collected from Faisalabad. Aspergillus flavus detected at maximum level (36.78%) of incidence while Botrytis spp. exhibited minimum (22.73) level of incidence. Highly fungal incidence was observed in case of PDA method as compared to blotter paper method in seeds collected from Sumandri. Aspergillus flavus detected at maximum level (39.03%) of incidence while Botrytis spp. exhibited minimum (21.32) level of incidence. Highly seed germination (87.38 %) was observed in case of Aliette treated seeds. Raydar also show approximately same result (82.60) as of Aliette while the seeds sown without treatment of any fungicides suspension and infested only with fungal isolates showed the lowest germination (64.16). Highly recovery of fungus (63.62%) was observed in case of control or non-treated seeds. The lowest recovery of fungus observed in case of Aliette treated seeds (51.12%). While Matalyxal and Mancozeb both chemical show approximately same result (60.62%, 60.36%) but better than of control. Highly seed germination (57.08 %) was observed in case of neem treated seeds. Garlic also show approximately same result (82.60) as of Neem while the seeds sown without treatment of any Plant extract suspension and infested only with fungal isolates showed the lowest germination (45.67%).  Highly recovery of fungus (52.40%) was observed in case of control or non-treated seeds. The lowest recovery of fungus observed in case of Ginger treated seeds (42.56%). While Garlic and onion both chemical show approximately same result (51.15%, 49.79%) but better than of control.

Key words: Coriandrum sativum L., mycoflora, fungicides, plant extracts


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